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ihovekreutzfeldt
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Increased computer temperature - what causes it?

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I upgraded my Macbook Pro 13" mid 2010 last week from the stock 250GB hard drive to http://www.amazon.co.uk/Western-Di [...] 118&sr=1-1

and the stock 2x2 GB RAM to 4x2 GB http://www.crucial.com/eu/store/pa [...] 1264BC1067

My MBP now constantly runs appr. 10 degrees Celcius hotter than before.

(I also installed Parallels and Windows XP and the temperature spikes to around 80/85 when I use it.)

It used to idle around 40-50. It rarely went above 55, even if I ran a video on VLC-player and had iTunes, Photoshop and Chrome with a bazillion tabs + a bunch of other stuff running in the background. And I'd have the laptop on a semi-soft material (a folder or a book)

Only if I had it on my lap for an extended amount of time would it get really hot. And "really hot" was max 80 C for a very limited time because the fans kicked in (max 4000 rpm)

Right now my MBP's temps are as following:

Hard drive: 40

CPU A: 65

Heatsink A: 52

Enclosure bottom: 37

Northbridge 1: 49

I'm running Chrome, iTunes and Photoshop and VLC Player idles in the background. Fans are at 2800 rpm which is appr. 800 rpm higher than what it used to before the upgrade, even with the same activity.

I just tried running VLC Player and Photoshop actively at the same time (playing a video and drawing) and the fan quickly spiked to nearly 5000 rpm. It's NEVER been that high before and I've had Photoshop, VLC Player, Chrome and iTunes running at the same time plenty of times before! The temp was 77 for CPU A and around 60 for most of the others.

Room temperature is around 22 I'd guess.

Even if the temperatures aren't that much higher it still makes a difference to the aluminium frame on my MBP. It easily gets very warm now which is a bit bothersome. I really don't like the sound of the fan at 4500 rpm so I'm a bit worried as well.

What causes it to become so warm? Do I need to swap my hard drive or my RAM back to the stock ones to get my MBP cooler or is there another solution?

Any help will be appreciated, thanks in advance

Oh! And the battery life has gone down as well.

Edited by: ihovekreutzfeldt ( )

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rj713
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The bigger hard drive and increased ram will generate more heat. You should open the computer and make sure the fan is clean and working properly. Also you might want to remove the heat sink and re-apply paste (recommend Artic Silver--sold by ifixit). Then as a last effort you might use a tray similar to the one link or better still Wal-Mart has a USB powered one for about $20. Good luck.

http://eshop.macsales.com/item/Road%20To...

Arctic Silver Thermal Paste

http://www.arcticsilver.com/as5.htm

Edited by: rj713 ( )

Product Image

Arctic Silver Thermal Paste

3.5 gram Arctic Silver thermal paste tube. Thermal paste forms a continuous, conductive layer between a processor and its head sink, improving cooling performance and keeping your important chips from overheating. Whenever you remove a heat sink, it's ver — 50+ available at 8.95 each.

good answer +

remacberlin,

+ Unless you really need the RAM, try cutting it back. It increases heat and reduces battery life.

mayer,

Thanks for the answer, I think I might try the tray first. Cracking my beloved machine open is a bit scary, but I'll see how it goes. Thank you!

ihovekreutzfeldt,

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Edwin Burnett
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Every Mac laptop that I have repaired has had heat issues, especially after being used for a year or more. The problem being that they are used as a"laptop" computer which is what they were actually designed for. The air vents in the back or bottom of the computer, where the air intake vents are, direct air to the cooling fans as well as allowing the fans to push the air out of the computer. The built in heat sinks are mounted on a bar that has air grills mounted on it. The grills gets loaded with dust and eventually becomes blocked. Then laptop heats up because of this blockage and eventually it will shut down to protect the CPU. There are built in heat sensing elements that will shut the computer down because of the heat issue. Laptops should never be placed on a person's lap so the air vents can be blocked. A favorite spot is on a bed, the worst place to use a laptop. Lint from clothing can be drawn in and forced through the vents, blocking the vent grills entirely. The very best thing to do, is to use a Docking station. Then only use the laptop on your lap occasionally when needed. The laptop will function as a desktop with the docking station and run much cooler.

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