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Miroslav Djuric
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How can I repair a hole on my shoe sole?

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I've had a pair of leather Skechers shoes for years. Over time, one of the shoe soles developed a quarter-sized hole through wear and tear, and I had to throw the shoes away. I purchased another pair of the same shoes, and now they're developing the same hole after being used for a couple of years.

The rest of the shoes look fine. Is there a viable way to repair the soles so that the shoes can last another couple of years?

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mister790
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I used to have shoes resoled at a local cobbler. Cost a fraction of buying new shoes and made the old shoes feel brand new. But this site is called "i" fixit -- so here's a link from howstuffworks.com that describes how to resole shoes yourself: http://home.howstuffworks.com/how-to-men...

Awesome... thanks!

Miroslav Djuric,

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11team
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if they are plastic / rubber soles

try a puncture repair kit from a bicycle shop

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rab777hp
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Sounds like normal wear and tear, a simple solution would be to just replace the soles, as the rest of the shoe is fine.

As for repair- there are kits to repair soles, however usually they're meant for quick fixes and not to be lasting repair, some searches can show you a few:

http://www.google.com/products?hl=en&sou...

however as stated before, these are usually just for quick crude fixes.

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Frank B
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There is a product just for this purpose ! It was "Bison Marathon", it then became "Bison Liquid Sole", and I think its now called "Bison Liquid Rubber". (Don't they love confusing us ?)

It flexibly fills the hole, and extended the life of a pair of my particular favourite shoes for a couple of years. Make sure the worn part of your shoe sole is as clean as you can possibly make it before applying. If the hole is right through, duct tape the inside first. Their web address is www.bison.net

A similar product is "Shoe Goo"

Try Googling these names for hardware stores in your area.

Edited by: Frank B ( )

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ivan
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Another great for rebuilding the soles of your shoes is "Shoegoo Adhesive" which can be found at your local walmart, target, homedepot etc. It comes in a red foil tube and is made by Eclectic Products.

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Barbara
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I have noticed that even good brand shoes will start to separate their rubber or plastic sole for me at the toe. I use Shoe Goo and lots of clamps for 24 hours. Eventually it might start to pull away again, and I redo it. Not the greatest but extends the life well beyond normal, since all of my shoes come from thrift shops and are already pre-loved.

I don't think in this consumer age things are meant to last, so I override that in most cases because usually I am crazy about the design. Birkenstocks are the only product I usually don't have to mess with, but I have even glued one pair that was about 10 years old.

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Peter
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I've had "walking" shoes with a supposed "1000 mile wear guaranty" delaminate or separate from the upper or wear through the tread in less than 100 miles of casual walking on concrete sidewalks. Rather than go through the hassle of getting the manufacture to honor the warranty and pay for return shipping, I repair separations and delamination with Gorilla Glue.

The normal lifetime of a modern casual shoe with a non-leather sole is generally less than 1 year of actual use. Composite soles with a tread and a foam midsole wear the fastest, rubber lug block soles somewhat slower. Soles stitched to the upper using a Goodyear-type welt , and vibram-type molded soles can be replaced, but may cost more than a new pair of shoes.

Tread wearout is very annoying if the upper and lining are still in good shape.

If you have a hole, try using McNett Freesole. Thoroughly clean and roughen the surface with sandpaper and lighter fluid or naptha and applying it in an even layer that extends 1" beyond the hole in all directions. Allow to dry for 48-72 hours, then use a sanding block to feather the edges.

PS If your shoes consistently develop holes in a particular location, rather than wearing evenly across the width of the sole, then that is a pressure point, and the best "fix" is prevention, not repair. A rigid shoe insole insert combines with an off the shelf insole will help distribute the wear more evenly.

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