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Yes for some things such as testing if the cable is good between the head phone jack and the other end of the cable that attaches to the motherboard. The cable will need to be disconnected from the motherboard to test that. The test is is called a continuity test. Most multimeters/mutitesters have this function. This kind of test is good for testing switches, such as the on/off switch, the cable will need to be unplugged from the motherboard. This test can also be used on cables from one end to the their end result, such as the head phone jack, again the cable will need unplugged from the motherboard. CAUTION: You do not want to run this test with a multitester across an IC you can harm them. Electricity follows the path of least resistance, therefore electricity will only flow between the path of the multimeter's test probes.
Yes for some things such as testing if the cable is good between the head phone jack and the other end of the cable that attaches to the motherboard. The cable will need to be disconnected from the motherboard to test that. The test is is called a continuity test. Most multimeters/mutitesters have this function. This kind of test is good for testing switches, such as the on/off switch, the cable will need to be unplugged from the motherboard. This test can also be used on cables from one end to the their end result, such as the head phone jack, again the cable will need unplugged from the motherboard. CAUTION: You do not want to run this test with a multitester across an IC you can harm them. Electricity follows the path of least resistance, therefore electricity will only flow between the path of the multimeter's test probes.
'''NOTE:''' You can actually make your own 3 volt continuity tester with a LED that shouldn't bother an IC. Instructions for doing that are here: http://www.instructables.com/id/Continuity-Tester/step8/Putting-it-together-3/http://www.instructables.com/id/Continuity-Tester/ For use as a tester for small things, such as iPone parts, I would modify the design in the instructable to do away with the big clip and use a probe tip on the end of the wire. I would also file down the tips of both "probes" to a fine point to ensure you are only touching and testing what you want to.
'''NOTE:''' You can actually make your own 3 volt continuity tester with a LED that shouldn't bother an IC. Instructions for doing that are here: http://www.instructables.com/id/Continuity-Tester/step8/Putting-it-together-3/http://www.instructables.com/id/Continuity-Tester/ For use as a tester for small things, such as iPone parts, I would modify the design in the instructable to do away with the big clip and use a probe tip on the end of the wire. I would also file down the tips of both "probes" to a fine point to ensure you are only touching and testing what you want to.

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Edit by ABCellars,

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Yes for some things such as testing if the cable is good between the head phone jack and the other end of the cable that attaches to the motherboard. The cable will need to be disconnected from the motherboard to test that. The test is is called a continuity test. Most multimeters/mutitesters have this function. This kind of test is good for testing switches, such as the on/off switch, the cable will need to be unplugged from the motherboard. This test can also be used on cables from one end to the their end result, such as the head phone jack, again the cable will need unplugged from the motherboard. CAUTION: You do not want to run this test with a multitester across an IC you can harm them. Electricity follows the path of least resistance, therefore electricity will only flow between the path of the multimeter's test probes.

'''NOTE:'''
You can actually make your own 3 volt continuity tester with a LED that shouldn't hurtbother an IC. Instructions for doing that are here: http://www.instructables.com/id/Continuity-Tester/step8/Putting-it-together-3/ For use as a tester for small things, such as iPone parts, I would modify the design in the instructable to do away with the big clip and use a probe tip on the end of the wire. I would also file down the tips of both "probes" to a fine point to ensure you are only touching and testing what you want to.
Yes for some things such as testing if the cable is good between the head phone jack and the other end of the cable that attaches to the motherboard. The cable will need to be disconnected from the motherboard to test that. The test is is called a continuity test. Most multimeters/mutitesters have this function. This kind of test is good for testing switches, such as the on/off switch, the cable will need to be unplugged from the motherboard. This test can also be used on cables from one end to the their end result, such as the head phone jack, again the cable will need unplugged from the motherboard. CAUTION: You do not want to run this test with a multitester across an IC you can harm them. Electricity follows the path of least resistance, therefore electricity will only flow between the path of the multimeter's test probes.

'''NOTE:'''
You can actually make your own 3 volt continuity tester with a LED that shouldn't hurtbother an IC. Instructions for doing that are here: http://www.instructables.com/id/Continuity-Tester/step8/Putting-it-together-3/ For use as a tester for small things, such as iPone parts, I would modify the design in the instructable to do away with the big clip and use a probe tip on the end of the wire. I would also file down the tips of both "probes" to a fine point to ensure you are only touching and testing what you want to.

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open

Edit by ABCellars,

Text:

Yes for some things such as testing if the cable is good between the head phone jack and the other end of the cable that attaches to the motherboard. The cable will need to be disconnected from the motherboard to test that. The test is is called a continuity test. Most multimeters/mutitesters have this function. This kind of test is good for testing switches, such as the on/off switch, the cable will need to be unplugged from the motherboard. This test can also be used on cables from one end to the their end result, such as the head phone jack, again the cable will need unplugged from the motherboard. CAUTION: You do not want to run this test across an IC you can harm them. Electricity follows the path of least resistance, therefore electricity will only flow between the path of the multimeter's test probes. You can actually make your own 3 volt continuity tester with a LED that shouldn't hurt an IC. Instructions for doing that are [http://www.instructables.com/id/Continuity-Tester/step8/Putting-it-together-3/]here: http://www.instructables.com/id/Continuity-Tester/step8/Putting-it-together-3/
Yes for some things such as testing if the cable is good between the head phone jack and the other end of the cable that attaches to the motherboard. The cable will need to be disconnected from the motherboard to test that. The test is is called a continuity test. Most multimeters/mutitesters have this function. This kind of test is good for testing switches, such as the on/off switch, the cable will need to be unplugged from the motherboard. This test can also be used on cables from one end to the their end result, such as the head phone jack, again the cable will need unplugged from the motherboard. CAUTION: You do not want to run this test across an IC you can harm them. Electricity follows the path of least resistance, therefore electricity will only flow between the path of the multimeter's test probes. You can actually make your own 3 volt continuity tester with a LED that shouldn't hurt an IC. Instructions for doing that are [http://www.instructables.com/id/Continuity-Tester/step8/Putting-it-together-3/]here: http://www.instructables.com/id/Continuity-Tester/step8/Putting-it-together-3/

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Edit by ABCellars,

Text:

Yes for some things such as testing if the cable is good between the head phone jack and the other end of the cable that attaches to the motherboard. The cable will need to be disconnected from the motherboard to test that. The test is is called a continuity test. Most multimeters/mutitesters have this function. This kind of test is good for testing switches, such as the on/off switch, the cable will need to be unplugged from the motherboard. This test can also be used on cables from one end to the their end result, such as the head phone jack, again the cable will need unplugged from the motherboard. CAUTION: You do not want to run this test across an IC you can harm them. ElectricityElectricity follows the path of least resistance, therefore electricity will only flow between the path of the multimeter's test probes. You can actually make your own 3 volt continuity tester with a LED that shouldn't hurt an IC. Instructions for doing that are [http://www.instructables.com/id/Continuity-Tester/step8/Putting-it-together-3/]
Yes for some things such as testing if the cable is good between the head phone jack and the other end of the cable that attaches to the motherboard. The cable will need to be disconnected from the motherboard to test that. The test is is called a continuity test. Most multimeters/mutitesters have this function. This kind of test is good for testing switches, such as the on/off switch, the cable will need to be unplugged from the motherboard. This test can also be used on cables from one end to the their end result, such as the head phone jack, again the cable will need unplugged from the motherboard. CAUTION: You do not want to run this test across an IC you can harm them. ElectricityElectricity follows the path of least resistance, therefore electricity will only flow between the path of the multimeter's test probes. You can actually make your own 3 volt continuity tester with a LED that shouldn't hurt an IC. Instructions for doing that are [http://www.instructables.com/id/Continuity-Tester/step8/Putting-it-together-3/]

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Edit by ABCellars,

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InsofarYes for some things such as the question asked here goes, I TOTALLY DISAGREE WITH CHRISB, ACCEPTED ANSWER OR NOT. The test(s) macpatagon is inquiring about only involves testing if the cable is good between the cableshead phone jack and theirthe other end result. To do this on an iPhone IT IS NECESSARY FOR THE CABLE TO BE UNPLUGGEDof the cable that attaches to the motherboard. The cable will need to be disconnected from the logicboardmotherboard to test that. The test usedis is called a continuity test. ElectricityThis kind of test is good for testing switches, such as the on/off switch, the cable will need to be unplugged from the motherboard. This test can also be used on cables from one end to the their end result, such as the head phone jack, again the cable will need unplugged from the motherboard. CAUTION: You do not want to run this test across an IC you can harm them. Electricity follows the path of least resistance, therefore electricity will only flow between the path of the multimeter's test probes. Voltage is potential difference. Unless you put a test probe on the end of a cable and the other probe on the other side of a component or IC, no voltage will pass through them, you can't damage anything. If you are testing between the charging doc and the flex cable end or microphone and flex cable end, even headset jacks and the flex cable end: YOU STAND NO CHANCE OF HARMING ANYTHING with the voltage in a multimeter.
InsofarYes for some things such as the question asked here goes, I TOTALLY DISAGREE WITH CHRISB, ACCEPTED ANSWER OR NOT. The test(s) macpatagon is inquiring about only involves testing if the cable is good between the cableshead phone jack and theirthe other end result. To do this on an iPhone IT IS NECESSARY FOR THE CABLE TO BE UNPLUGGEDof the cable that attaches to the motherboard. The cable will need to be disconnected from the logicboardmotherboard to test that. The test usedis is called a continuity test. ElectricityThis kind of test is good for testing switches, such as the on/off switch, the cable will need to be unplugged from the motherboard. This test can also be used on cables from one end to the their end result, such as the head phone jack, again the cable will need unplugged from the motherboard. CAUTION: You do not want to run this test across an IC you can harm them. Electricity follows the path of least resistance, therefore electricity will only flow between the path of the multimeter's test probes. Voltage is potential difference. Unless you put a test probe on the end of a cable and the other probe on the other side of a component or IC, no voltage will pass through them, you can't damage anything. If you are testing between the charging doc and the flex cable end or microphone and flex cable end, even headset jacks and the flex cable end: YOU STAND NO CHANCE OF HARMING ANYTHING with the voltage in a multimeter.

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Original post by ABCellars,

Text:

Insofar as the question asked here goes, I TOTALLY DISAGREE WITH CHRISB, ACCEPTED ANSWER OR NOT. The test(s) macpatagon is inquiring about only involves testing between the cables and their end result. To do this on an iPhone IT IS NECESSARY FOR THE CABLE TO BE UNPLUGGED from the logicboard. The test used is called a continuity test. Electricity follows the path of least resistance, therefore electricity will only flow between the path of the multimeter's test probes. Voltage is potential difference. Unless you put a test probe on the end of a cable and the other probe on the other side of a component or IC, no voltage will pass through them, you can't damage anything. If you are testing between the charging doc and the flex cable end or microphone and flex cable end, even headset jacks and the flex cable end: YOU STAND NO CHANCE OF HARMING ANYTHING with the voltage in a multimeter.

Status:

open